Anesthesia

Pharmacogenomics

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Anesthesia

Mutations in the CACNA1S and RYR1  genes are known to increase the risk of malignant hyperthermia.  Malignant hyperthermia is a severe reaction to particular drugs that are often used during surgery and other invasive procedures.

  • Malignant Hyperthermia

Malignant hyperthermia is a severe reaction to particular drugs that are often used during surgery and other invasive procedures. 

Price: $300.00

Test Details

Mutations in the CACNA1S and RYR1  genes are known to increase the risk of malignant hyperthermia.  Malignant hyperthermia is a severe reaction to particular drugs that are often used during surgery and other invasive procedures.

CACNA1S, RYR1

  • Malignant Hyperthermia

Malignant hyperthermia is a severe reaction to particular drugs that are often used during surgery and other invasive procedures. Specifically, this reaction occurs in response to some anesthetic gases, which are used to block the sensation of pain, and with a muscle relaxant that is used to temporarily paralyze a person during a surgical procedure. If given these drugs, people at risk for malignant hyperthermia may experience muscle rigidity, breakdown of muscle fibers (rhabdomyolysis), a high fever, increased acid levels in the blood and other tissues (acidosis), and a rapid heart rate. Without prompt treatment, the complications of malignant hyperthermia can be life-threatening.

People at increased risk for this disorder are said to have malignant hyperthermia susceptibility. Affected individuals may never know they have the condition unless they undergo testing or have a severe reaction to anesthesia during a surgical procedure. While this condition often occurs in people without other serious medical problems, certain inherited muscle diseases (including central core disease and multiminicore disease) are associated with malignant hyperthermia susceptibility.

The RYR1 gene provides instructions for making a protein called ryanodine receptor 1. This protein is part of a family of ryanodine receptors, which form channels that transport positively charged calcium atoms (ions) within cells. Channels made with the ryanodine receptor 1 protein play a critical role in muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles).

For the body to move normally, skeletal muscles must tense (contract) and relax in a coordinated way. Muscle contractions are triggered by the flow of positively charged ions, including calcium, into muscle cells.

When muscles are at rest, calcium ions are stored in a cellular structure called the sarcoplasmic reticulum inside each muscle cell. In response to certain signals, the RYR1 channel releases calcium ions from the sarcoplasmic reticulum into the surrounding cell fluid (cytoplasm). The resulting increase in calcium ion concentration stimulates muscle fibers to contract, allowing the body to move. The process by which certain chemical signals trigger muscle contraction is called excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling.

Mutations in the RYR1 gene cause the RYR1 channel to open more easily and close more slowly in response to certain drugs. As a result, large amounts of calcium ions are released from storage within muscle cells. An overabundance of available calcium ions causes skeletal muscles to contract abnormally, which leads to muscle rigidity in people with malignant hyperthermia. An increase in calcium ion concentration within muscle cells also activates processes that generate heat (leading to increased body temperature) and produce excess acid (leading to acidosis).

https://genestreet.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Pharmacogenomics-Gene-Function.pdf

At least 217 mutations in the RYR1 gene are known to increase the risk of malignant hyperthermia. Most of these mutations change single amino acids in important regions of the ryanodine receptor 1 protein. These mutations alter the structure of the RYR1 channel, causing it to open more easily and close more slowly in response to certain drugs (particularly some anesthetic gases and a type of muscle relaxant used during surgery). As a result, large amounts of calcium ions are released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum within muscle cells. An overabundance of available calcium ions causes skeletal muscles to contract abnormally, which leads to muscle rigidity in people with malignant hyperthermia. An increase in calcium ion concentration within muscle cells also activates processes that generate heat (leading to increased body temperature) and produce excess acid (leading to acidosis).

Many other changes in the RYR1 gene have been described in people with an increased risk of malignant hyperthermia. It is unclear, however, whether these variations are directly related to malignant hyperthermia risk.

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to increase the risk of a severe reaction to certain drugs used during surgery. In most cases, an affected person inherits the altered gene from a parent who is also at risk for the condition.

Malignant hyperthermia occurs in 1 in 5,000 to 50,000 instances in which people are given anesthetic gases. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia is probably more frequent, because many people with an increased risk of this condition are never exposed to drugs that trigger a reaction.

The CPIC Dosing Guideline recommends that halogenated volatile anesthetics such as desflurane, enflurane, halothane, isoflurane, methoxyflurane, sevoflurane and the depolarizing muscle relaxants succinylcholine are relatively contraindicated in persons with malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS). See full guideline for disclaimers, further details and supporting evidence.

The guidelines focus on the clinical utility of the identification of variants in these genes in individuals without a personal or family history of a reaction to these drugs or agents.

This annotation is based on the CPIC® guideline for potent volatile anesthetic agents and succinylcholine and RYR1 and CACNA1S.

Patients who plan to have or are scheduled to have a medical procedure that require anesthesia.

Malignant hyperthermia is a severe reaction to particular drugs that are often used during surgery and other invasive procedures. Specifically, this reaction occurs in response to some anesthetic gases, which are used to block the sensation of pain, and with a muscle relaxant that is used to temporarily paralyze a person during a surgical procedure. If given these drugs, people at risk for malignant hyperthermia may experience muscle rigidity, breakdown of muscle fibers (rhabdomyolysis), a high fever, increased acid levels in the blood and other tissues (acidosis), and a rapid heart rate. Without prompt treatment, the complications of malignant hyperthermia can be life-threatening.

  • PCR
  • Next-Generation  Sequencing
  • Deletion/Duplication Analysis

All sequencing technologies have limitations. This analysis is performed by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and is designed to examine coding regions and splicing junctions. Although next generation sequencing technologies and our bioinformatics analysis significantly reduce the contribution of pseudogene sequences or other highly-homologous sequences, these may still occasionally interfere with the technical ability of the assay to identify pathogenic variant alleles in both sequencing and deletion/duplication analyses. Sanger sequencing is used to confirm variants with low quality scores and to meet coverage standards. If ordered, deletion/duplication analysis can identify alterations of genomic regions which include one whole gene (buccal swab specimens and whole blood specimens) and are two or more contiguous exons in size (whole blood specimens only); single exon deletions or duplications may occasionally be identified, but are not routinely detected by this test. Identified putative deletions or duplications are confirmed by an orthogonal method (qPCR or MLPA). This assay will not detect certain types of genomic alterations which may cause disease such as, but not limited to, translocations or inversions, repeat expansions (eg. trinucleotides or hexanucleotides), alterations in most regulatory regions (promoter regions) or deep intronic regions (greater than 20bp from an exon). This assay is not designed or validated for the detection of somatic mosaicism or somatic mutations.

Buccal Swab

2- 3 weeks

81408

NOTE: The CPT codes listed on the website are in accordance with Current Procedural Terminology, a publication of the American Medical Association. CPT codes are provided here for the convenience of our clients. Clients who bill for services should make the final decision on which codes to use.

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