AntiBiotic Resistance (ABR)

AntiBiotic Resistance (ABR)

Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria change so that antibiotic medicines can’t kill them or stop their growth. As a result, bacterial infections become extremely difficult to treat.

Antibiotic resistance is a type of antimicrobial resistance. Fungi, parasites and viruses can also develop drug resistance.

Your body doesn’t develop antibiotic resistance — bacteria do. When antibiotic resistance happens, fewer antibiotics are effective against a particular bacterium. Other antibiotics often help, but it is important to have as many treatment options available as possible.

 

Price: $150.00

Test Details

Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria change so that antibiotic medicines can’t kill them or stop their growth. As a result, bacterial infections become extremely difficult to treat.

Antibiotic resistance is a type of antimicrobial resistance. Fungi, parasites and viruses can also develop drug resistance.

Your body doesn’t develop antibiotic resistance — bacteria do. When antibiotic resistance happens, fewer antibiotics are effective against a particular bacterium. Other antibiotics often help, but it is important to have as many treatment options available as possible.

Antibiotics are medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, they can save lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and resist the effects of an antibiotic. Resistant bacteria may continue to grow and multiply.

Each time you take antibiotics there is a risk that the bacteria will become resistant. Resistant infections can be difficult and sometimes impossible to treat. They can spread to other people. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one example. It causes infections that are resistant to several common antibiotics.

Antibiotic resistance can cause problems. To help prevent antibiotic resistance:

  • Don’t use antibiotics for viruses like colds or flu. Antibiotics don’t work on viruses.
  • Don’t ask your health care provider to give you an antibiotic.
  • When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Finish your medicine even if you feel better. If you stop treatment too soon, some bacteria may survive and re-infect you.
  • Do not share your antibiotics with others.
  • Don’t save antibiotics for later or use someone else’s prescription.
  1. cephalosporin-hydrolyzing class C beta-lactamase ACT (blaMIR)
  2. cephalosporin-hydrolyzing class C beta-lactamase (blaACT)
  3. class C beta-lactamase CMY (blaCMY)
  4. cephalosporin-hydrolyzing class C beta-lactamase ACC (blaACC)
  5. CMY-1/MOX family class C beta-lactamase CMY(blaMOX)
  6. OXA-1 family class D beta-lactamase (blaOXA)
  7. OXA-48 family class D beta-lactamase OXA (blaOXA)
  8. class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase CTX-M (blaCTX-M)
  9. class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase CTX-M (blaCTX-M)
  10. class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase CTX-M (blaCTX-M)
  11. class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase CTX-M(blaCTX-M)
  12. class C beta-lactamase DHA (blaDHA)
  13. 23S rRNA (adenine(2058)-N(6))-methyltransferase Erm(A) (erm(A))
  14. 23S rRNA (adenine(2058)-N(6))-methyltransferase Erm(B) (erm(B))
  15. Staphylococcus aureus
  16. Staphylococcus epidermidis
  17. cephalosporin-hydrolyzing class C beta-lactamase FOX (blaFOX)
  18. class A beta-lactamase GES(blaGES)
  19. subclass B1 metallo-beta-lactamase IMP (blaIMP)
  20. subclass B1 metallo-beta-lactamase IMP(blaIMP)
  21. subclass B1 metallo-beta-lactamase IMP (blaIMP)
  22. subclass B1 metallo-beta-lactamase IMP(blaIMP)
  23. carbapenem-hydrolyzing class A beta-lactamase KPC(blaKPC)
  24. PBP2a family beta-lactam-resistant peptidoglycan transpeptidase MecA (mecA)
  25. subclass B1 metallo-beta-lactamase (blaNDM)
  26. OXA-23 family carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D beta-lactamase OXA(blaOXA)
  27. class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase PER(blaPER)
  28. class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase PER (blaPER)
  29. quinolone resistance pentapeptide repeat protein QnrA2 (qnrA)
  30. quinolone resistance pentapeptide repeat protein QnrS9 (qnrS)
  31. D-alanine–(R)-lactate ligase VanA (vanA)
  32. D-alanine–(R)-lactate ligase VanB (vanB)
  33. D-alanine–D-serine ligase VanC2/3 (vanC)
  34. D-alanine–D-serine ligase VanC1 (vanC)
  35. D-alanine–D-serine ligase VanC2/3 (vanC)
  36. class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (blaVEB)
  37. subclass B1 metallo-beta-lactamase VIM(blaVIM)

Antibiotic Class/Subclass

  1. Extended-Spectrum-Beta-lactamase/Cephalosporin
  2. Macrolide
  3. Beta-Lactamase/Penicillin
  4. Beta-Lactamase/Carbapenem
  5. Beta-Lactamase/Penicillin
  6. Quinolone
  7. Glycopeptide/Vancomycin

Antibiotics

  1. Cephalosporin
  2. Ampicillin
  3. Cephamycin
  4. Cefoxitin
  5. Erythromycin
  6. Methicillin/Staphcillin
  7. Imipenem
  8. Carbapenem
  9. Moxalactam
  10. Oxacillin/Bactocil
  11. Quinolone
  12. Vancomycin/Vancocin

 

 

 

 

ABR testing is performed as a reflex test when a pathogen is detected in the:

  • Respiratory Pathogen Panel (RPP)
  • Urinary Tract Infection Panel (UTI)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection Panel (STI) 
  • Wound/Hair/Nail Panel

Left over sample from pathogen panel:

  • nasal swab
  • urine
  • vaginal swab
  • wound swab
  • nail clipping
  • hair
  • 2- 5 days