Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP)

$49.00

A Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) is a blood test that measures the levels of certain electrolytes and chemicals in the blood. The panel typically includes tests for:

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About the Test

A Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) is a blood test that measures the levels of certain electrolytes and chemicals in the blood. The panel typically includes tests for:

  1. Glucose: a measure of blood sugar levels.
  2. Sodium: an electrolyte that helps regulate fluid balance in the body.
  3. Potassium: an electrolyte that helps regulate heart function and muscle contraction.
  4. Calcium: a measure of calcium in blood.
  5. Chloride: an electrolyte that helps regulate fluid balance in the body.
  6. Carbon Dioxide (bicarbonate): a measure of the acid-base balance in the blood.
  7. Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN): a measure of kidney function.
  8. Creatinine: a waste product that indicates kidney function.

FAQs

Specimen Requirements :

SST tube of blood, serum

Turn Around Time :

    5 to 24 hours

Price For Test :

    Price: $49

Analytes Tested in the Basic Metabolic Panel

8  Analytes

  1. BUN
  2. Calcium
  3. Carbon Dioxide
  4. Chloride
  5. Creatinine
  6. Glucose
  7. Potassium
  8. Sodium
Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)

BUN, or Blood Urea Nitrogen, is a blood test that measures the amount of nitrogen in the form of urea in the blood. Urea is a waste product that is produced when protein is broken down in the body. BUN is used as an indicator of kidney function because the kidneys filter waste products, including urea, from the blood and excrete them in the urine. Elevated BUN levels can indicate a number of kidney-related problems, such as dehydration, kidney disease, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as other conditions such as heart failure and liver disease. Low BUN levels can indicate malnutrition, liver disease, or the over-hydration of a patient. Interpretation of BUN levels should be done in conjunction with other laboratory tests, such as creatinine, electrolyte levels, and kidney function tests, to accurately diagnose and monitor kidney-related conditions.

Calcium, Serum

Calcium is a mineral that is essential for many functions in the body. It is best known for its role in building and maintaining strong bones, but it also plays a role in blood clotting, muscle function, and other processes. The majority of calcium in the body is stored in bones, but a small amount is found in the bloodstream and other tissues.

Calcium can be obtained through the diet by consuming foods that are high in calcium, such as dairy products, leafy green vegetables, nuts, and fortified foods. The body also requires vitamin D to absorb calcium, so it is important to maintain a healthy balance of both calcium and vitamin D in the diet.

A calcium deficiency, or hypocalcemia, can result from not getting enough calcium in the diet, problems with absorbing calcium, or medical conditions such as kidney disease or hormonal imbalances. Symptoms of hypocalcemia can include muscle cramps, spasms, and tingling sensations, as well as more serious symptoms such as seizures and heart problems.

Elevated calcium levels, or hypercalcemia, can also occur and can be a sign of medical conditions such as overactive parathyroid glands, certain types of cancer, and certain medications.

It is important to maintain healthy calcium levels through a balanced diet and, when necessary, with the help of calcium supplements and other treatments recommended by a healthcare provider.

A Serum Calcium Blood Test measures the total amount of calcium in the blood, including both ionized calcium and calcium that is bound to proteins such as albumin. The test is used to evaluate calcium levels and to diagnose and monitor conditions related to calcium metabolism, such as osteoporosis, hyperparathyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, and kidney disease. The test can also help monitor the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions.

Normal results for serum calcium levels are typically in the range of 8.5-10.5 mg/dL. However, the normal range can vary depending on the laboratory that performed the test and other factors such as age, gender, and overall health.

It is important to interpret the results of a Serum Calcium Blood Test in the context of a person’s medical history, symptoms, and other laboratory tests. Abnormal results may require additional testing and evaluation by a healthcare provider to diagnose and manage calcium-related conditions.

Carbon Dioxide

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a gas that is produced in the body as a result of cellular metabolism and respiration. In the body, carbon dioxide is carried in the bloodstream to the lungs, where it is exhaled.

Carbon dioxide is measured as part of a blood test called a Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) to assess the acid-base balance in the body. The bicarbonate (HCO3-) level in the blood, which is a measure of the body’s ability to buffer acids, is used to calculate the carbon dioxide level.

Normal levels of carbon dioxide in the blood are typically in the range of 22-28 mEq/L. Abnormal levels can indicate a disturbance in the body’s acid-base balance, which can be caused by a variety of conditions such as kidney disease, respiratory alkalosis, metabolic acidosis, and others.

It is important to interpret the results of a carbon dioxide test in the context of a person’s medical history, symptoms, and other laboratory tests to accurately diagnose and manage conditions related to acid-base balance.

Chloride

Chloride is an electrolyte that is present in the body as chloride ions (Cl-). It plays a role in maintaining the body’s fluid balance, helps to regulate blood pressure, and is involved in the production of stomach acid.

Chloride levels in the blood can be measured as part of a routine blood test called a Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP). Normal levels of chloride in the blood are typically in the range of 96-106 mEq/L.

Abnormal chloride levels can indicate a variety of conditions, such as dehydration, kidney disease, and metabolic imbalances. Elevated chloride levels (hyperchloremia) can also occur in conditions such as metabolic acidosis and kidney failure, while low chloride levels (hypochloremia) can occur in conditions such as dehydration and diarrhea.

It is important to interpret the results of a chloride test in the context of a person’s medical history, symptoms, and other laboratory tests to accurately diagnose and manage conditions related to chloride levels.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a waste product that is produced by muscle metabolism and is normally filtered from the blood by the kidneys. The level of creatinine in the blood is an indicator of kidney function.

A creatinine blood test measures the amount of creatinine in the blood and is usually performed as part of a routine blood test called a Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP). Normal levels of creatinine in the blood vary by age, gender, and muscle mass, but typically range from 0.5-1.2 mg/dL for men and 0.4-1.1 mg/dL for women.

Elevated creatinine levels (above the normal range) can indicate a decrease in kidney function or a decrease in blood flow to the kidneys. In some cases, elevated creatinine levels can also be a result of excessive muscle breakdown or the use of certain medications.

Low creatinine levels can be seen in conditions such as malnutrition, muscle wasting, or liver disease, which can affect muscle metabolism and creatinine production.

It is important to interpret the results of a creatinine test in the context of a person’s medical history, symptoms, and other laboratory tests to accurately diagnose and manage conditions related to kidney function.

Glucose

Glucose is a type of sugar that is the main source of energy for the body’s cells. The level of glucose in the blood is tightly regulated by hormones such as insulin and glucagon.

A glucose blood test measures the amount of glucose in the blood. The test is usually performed as part of a routine blood test called a Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) or as a separate test to screen for or monitor conditions such as diabetes.

Normal fasting blood glucose levels are typically in the range of 70-100 mg/dL. Higher than normal levels (hyperglycemia) can be seen in conditions such as diabetes, while lower than normal levels (hypoglycemia) can be seen in conditions such as insulinoma, an overactive adrenal gland, or excessive insulin therapy in people with diabetes.

It is important to interpret the results of a glucose test in the context of a person’s medical history, symptoms, and other laboratory tests to accurately diagnose and manage conditions related to blood glucose levels.

Potassium

Potassium is an electrolyte that is essential for maintaining normal heart and muscle function, fluid balance, and acid-base balance in the body.

A potassium blood test measures the amount of potassium in the blood. The test is usually performed as part of a routine blood test called a Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) or as a separate test to screen for or monitor conditions such as high or low potassium levels.

Normal potassium levels in the blood are typically in the range of 3.5-5.0 mEq/L. High potassium levels (hyperkalemia) can be seen in conditions such as kidney disease, medications, and certain metabolic disorders, while low potassium levels (hypokalemia) can be seen in conditions such as malnutrition, excessive sweating, and the use of certain medications.

It is important to interpret the results of a potassium test in the context of a person’s medical history, symptoms, and other laboratory tests to accurately diagnose and manage conditions related to potassium levels.

Sodium

Sodium is an electrolyte that helps regulate fluid balance, blood volume, and blood pressure in the body.

A sodium blood test measures the amount of sodium in the blood. The test is usually performed as part of a routine blood test called a Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) or as a separate test to screen for or monitor conditions such as high or low sodium levels.

Normal sodium levels in the blood are typically in the range of 135-145 mEq/L. High sodium levels (hypernatremia) can be seen in conditions such as dehydration, excessive salt intake, and certain medical conditions, while low sodium levels (hyponatremia) can be seen in conditions such as excessive water intake, certain medications, and certain medical conditions.

It is important to interpret the results of a sodium test in the context of a person’s medical history, symptoms, and other laboratory tests to accurately diagnose and manage conditions related to sodium levels.

Lab Method
Specimen Requirements

SST tube of blood, serum

Turn Around Time

5 to 24 hours

Price For Test

Price: $49