Diabetes Management Blood Test

$179.00

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About the Test

Blood tests are an important part of diabetes management. They help to monitor blood sugar levels and assess the effectiveness of treatments.

FAQs

Specimen Requirements :

SST tube of blood, serum

Turn Around Time :

    5 to 24 hours

Price For Test :

    Price: $179

Overview

Blood tests are an important part of diabetes management. They help to monitor blood sugar levels and assess the effectiveness of treatments. 

Analytes Teste in Diabetes Management Blood Test

24 Analytes

CMP: 18 Analytes

  1. Albumin
  2. Albumin/Globulin Ratio (calc)
  3. Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)
  4. ALT (Alanine Aminotransferase)
  5. AST (Aspartate Aminotransferase)
  6. Bilirubin Total
  7. Bilirubin Direct
  8. Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)
  9. Calcium
  10. Carbon Dioxide
  11. Chloride
  12. Creatinine
  13. EGFR (calc)
  14. Iron
  15. Glucose
  16. Protein, Total
  17. Potassium
  18. Sodium

Lipid Panel: 5 Analytes

  1. Total Cholesterol
  2. LDL Cholesterol
  3. HDL Cholesterol
  4. VLDL
  5. Triglycerides

Complete Blood Count (CBC) 

HbA1C

Albumin

Albumin is a protein produced by the liver that is an important part of the blood. It helps regulate the fluid balance in the body, transports hormones and other substances, and maintains the proper blood pressure. Low levels of albumin can indicate a variety of conditions, including liver disease, malnutrition, or kidney disease. Measuring albumin levels is a common blood test used to evaluate a person’s overall health status and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment for certain conditions.

Albumin/Globulin Ratio (Calc)

The Albumin/Globulin Ratio (AGR) is a calculation that is performed to evaluate the balance between two major proteins in the blood: albumin and globulin. The AGR is obtained by dividing the serum albumin level by the total globulin level. A low AGR can indicate a variety of conditions, including liver disease, malnutrition, and kidney disease, while a high AGR can indicate dehydration or overhydration. The AGR is used in conjunction with other tests and clinical information to help diagnose and monitor various health conditions.

Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphates from a variety of organic compounds. It is found in many tissues and organs, including the liver, bone, and intestines, and its activity is commonly used as a marker for various medical conditions, including liver and bone disease. Elevated levels of ALP in the blood can indicate a number of health issues and further tests are usually needed to determine the underlying cause.

ALT (Alanine Aminotransferase)

ALT (Alanine Aminotransferase) is an enzyme found mainly in liver cells. Elevated levels of ALT in the blood can indicate liver damage, such as from viral hepatitis, alcohol use, or certain medications. Measuring ALT levels is a common way to screen for liver problems and monitor their progression. However, elevated ALT levels do not always indicate liver disease and other tests such as ultrasound, biopsy, or further blood tests are often needed to diagnose the underlying cause.

Bilirubin Total

Bilirubin Total is a blood test that measures the total amount of bilirubin in the blood. Bilirubin is a yellow pigment that is produced when red blood cells break down and is normally removed from the body by the liver. Elevated levels of bilirubin can indicate a number of liver or blood disorders, including liver disease, anemia, or increased red blood cell breakdown. Low levels of bilirubin are not usually a concern, but in some cases can indicate problems with bilirubin metabolism or removal. Measuring bilirubin total is a common way to screen for liver and blood problems and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment.

Bilirubin Direct

Bilirubin Direct (Conjugated Bilirubin) is a blood test that measures the level of bilirubin that has been conjugated, or combined with glucuronic acid, in the liver. Conjugated bilirubin is water-soluble and can be easily excreted from the body in the bile. Elevated levels of conjugated bilirubin can indicate a number of liver problems, including blockage of the bile ducts, liver disease, or hepatitis. Low levels of conjugated bilirubin are not usually a concern. Measuring bilirubin direct is a common way to screen for liver problems and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. The total bilirubin level and the direct bilirubin level are often measured together to provide a more complete picture of liver function.

Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)
Calcium
Carbon Dioxide
Chloride
Creatinine
EGFR (calc)

EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor) is a protein found on the surface of certain cells that helps regulate cell growth and division. Measuring the level of EGFR in the blood is used to help diagnose and monitor certain types of cancer, including lung, breast, and head and neck cancer. High levels of EGFR can indicate an increased risk of cancer progression and poor response to treatment, while low levels can indicate a good response to treatment or a low risk of cancer progression. The measurement of EGFR levels is used in conjunction with other tests and clinical information to guide diagnosis and treatment decisions.

Glucose
Iron

Iron is a chemical element with the symbol Fe and atomic number 26. It is a metal that is abundant in the Earth’s crust and is widely used for various purposes, including construction, transportation, electrical and electronic appliances, and medical equipment. Iron is also an essential component of hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the body’s tissues.

Serum iron refers to the level of iron in the liquid portion of blood, known as serum. It is a commonly measured component in a blood test, which helps to evaluate a person’s iron status. Low levels of serum iron can indicate iron deficiency anemia, while high levels can indicate conditions such as hemochromatosis (an iron overload disorder). The normal range of serum iron levels may vary slightly depending on the laboratory, but generally falls between 50-150 mcg/dL.

Potassium
Protein, Total

Total protein is a laboratory test that measures the total amount of protein present in the blood. It is a broad test that reflects the overall protein status of the body and can provide information about various health conditions. The test results are typically reported in grams per deciliter (g/dL).

The normal range for total protein may vary slightly depending on the laboratory, but generally falls between 6.0 to 8.5 g/dL. Abnormal results may indicate a variety of conditions, including malnutrition, liver or kidney disease, inflammation, and certain infections. A healthcare professional will interpret the results in the context of a person’s overall health and medical history.

Sodium
Total Cholesterol

Total cholesterol is a measure of the overall amount of cholesterol in the blood. Cholesterol is a type of fat that is produced by the liver and also obtained from food.

High levels of total cholesterol can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke by contributing to the buildup of plaque in the arteries. The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening.

A total cholesterol test is typically performed as part of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides.

Normal total cholesterol levels are considered to be less than 200 mg/dL. However, the target level of total cholesterol depends on a person’s individual risk factors, such as age, family history, and lifestyle. A healthcare provider can interpret the results of a total cholesterol test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed.

LDL Cholesterol

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is sometimes referred to as the “bad” cholesterol because high levels can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. LDL cholesterol contributes to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, which can narrow or block blood flow.

The LDL cholesterol test measures the amount of LDL cholesterol in the blood. It is typically performed as part of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides.

The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening. Normal LDL cholesterol levels are considered to be less than 130 mg/dL. However, the target level of LDL cholesterol depends on a person’s individual risk factors, such as age, family history, and lifestyle.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of an LDL cholesterol test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. This may include changes to diet and exercise, as well as medication to lower cholesterol levels.

HDL Cholesterol

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is sometimes referred to as the “good” cholesterol because high levels are associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke. HDL cholesterol helps remove plaque from the arteries and reduce the risk of heart disease.

The HDL cholesterol test measures the amount of HDL cholesterol in the blood. It is typically performed as part of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.

The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening. Normal HDL cholesterol levels are considered to be 40 mg/dL or higher. Higher levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with a lower risk of heart disease, while lower levels are associated with an increased risk.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of an HDL cholesterol test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. This may include changes to diet and exercise, as well as medication to raise HDL cholesterol levels.

VLDL

Very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) is a type of lipid, or fat, found in the blood. VLDL is produced by the liver and is a source of triglycerides, which are a form of fat that is stored in the body’s fat cells.

VLDL is one of the components of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides. The VLDL test measures the amount of VLDL in the blood.

High levels of VLDL in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. VLDL contributes to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, which can narrow or block blood flow.

The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening. Normal VLDL levels vary, but are typically considered to be less than 30 mg/dL. However, the target level of VLDL depends on a person’s individual risk factors, such as age, family history, and lifestyle.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of a VLDL test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. This may include changes to diet, exercise, and medication to lower VLDL levels.

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a type of fat that is found in the blood and stored in the body’s fat cells. Triglycerides are the main form of fat in the diet and are also produced by the liver.

The triglycerides blood test measures the amount of triglycerides in the blood. It is typically performed as part of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides.

High levels of triglycerides in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Triglycerides contribute to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, which can narrow or block blood flow.

The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening. Normal triglyceride levels are considered to be less than 150 mg/dL. However, the target level of triglycerides depends on a person’s individual risk factors, such as age, family history, and lifestyle.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of a triglycerides test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. This may include changes to diet, exercise, and medication to lower triglyceride levels.

Complete Blood Count (CBC)

A complete blood count (CBC) is a blood test that measures the different cells in the blood, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The CBC provides important information about a person’s overall health and can help diagnose a variety of medical conditions, including anemia, infections, and blood disorders.

The following components of the blood are measured during a CBC:

  1. Red blood cells (RBCs) – measure the number and size of red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the body’s tissues.
  2. Hemoglobin – measures the amount of oxygen-carrying protein in the blood.
  3. Hematocrit – measures the proportion of red blood cells to the total volume of blood.
  4. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) – measures the average size of red blood cells.
  5. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) – measures the average amount of hemoglobin in red blood cells.
  6. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) – measures the average concentration of hemoglobin in red blood cells.
  7. White blood cells (WBCs) – measure the number of different types of white blood cells, which play a role in fighting infections.
  8. Platelets – measure the number of small cells that help blood to clot.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of a CBC and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. The normal range for the results of a CBC may vary depending on the laboratory that performs the test. It is important to keep in mind that the results of a CBC can be influenced by factors such as age, gender, and overall health.

Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C)

Glycated hemoglobin, also known as HbA1c, glycohemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, A1C, is a form of hemoglobin (Hb) that is chemically linked to a sugar. Most monosaccharides, including glucose, galactose and fructose, spontaneously (i.e. non-enzymatically) bond with hemoglobin when present in the bloodstream.

HbA1c is measured primarily to determine the three-month average blood sugar level and can be used as a diagnostic test for diabetes mellitus and as an assessment test for glycemic control in people with diabetes.[5] The test is limited to a three-month average because the average lifespan of a red blood cell is four months. Since individual red blood cells have varying lifespans, the test is used as a limited measure of three months. Normal levels of glucose produce a normal amount of glycated hemoglobin. As the average amount of plasma glucose increases, the fraction of glycated hemoglobin increases in a predictable way. In diabetes, higher amounts of glycated hemoglobin, indicating poorer control of blood glucose levels, have been associated with cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy.

Lab Method
Price For Test

Price: $179

Specimen Requirements

SST tube of blood, serum

Turn Around Time

5 to 24 hours