Female Elite Blood Panel

$499.00

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About the Test

The Female Elite Blood Panel is a set of blood tests that are designed to assess a woman’s overall health and wellbeing. These tests typically include a variety of tests that evaluate various aspects of a female’s health, including blood sugar, cholesterol, liver and kidney function, hormonal levels, and more.

The Female Elite Blood Panel can be helpful for detecting and managing a variety of medical conditions, such as thyroid disorders, diabetes, and hormonal imbalances. The results of the blood test can help healthcare providers make a diagnosis and develop a treatment plan if necessary.

It’s important to discuss the results of the Female Elite Wellness Blood Panel with a healthcare provider, who can provide the necessary context and recommend appropriate follow-up if needed.

FAQs

Specimen Requirements :

  • SST tube of blood, serum
  • Lavender top, Plasma
  • Urine

Turn Around Time :

    5 to 24 hours

Price For Test :

    Price: $299

Overview Of The Comprehensive Wellness Blood Test

A comprehensive wellness blood test is a set of blood tests that are designed to assess a person’s overall health and wellbeing. These tests typically include a variety of tests that evaluate various aspects of a person’s health, including blood sugar, cholesterol, liver and kidney function, hormonal levels, and more.

Specific tests included in a comprehensive wellness blood test can vary depending on the healthcare provider or lab that administers the test, but some common tests that may be included are:

  • Complete blood count (CBC)
  • Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP)
  • Lipid panel
  • Thyroid function tests (TSH, free T4)
  • Vitamin D level
  • Iron panel
  • Sex hormone levels (estradiol, progesterone, testosterone)

A comprehensive wellness blood test can be helpful for detecting and managing a variety of medical conditions, such as thyroid disorders, diabetes, and hormonal imbalances. The results of the blood test can help healthcare providers make a diagnosis and develop a treatment plan if necessary.

It’s important to discuss the results of a comprehensive wellness blood test with a healthcare provider, who can provide the necessary context and recommend appropriate follow-up if needed.

Analytes Tested

51 Analytes

  1. Albumin
  2. Albumin/Globulin Ratio 
  3. Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)
  4. ALT (Alanine Aminotransferase)
  5. AST (Aspartate Aminotransferase)
  6. Bilirubin Total
  7. Bilirubin Direct
  8. Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)
  9. Calcium
  10. Carbon Dioxide
  11. Chloride
  12. Creatinine
  13. EGFR (calc)
  14. Iron
  15. Glucose
  16. Protein, Total
  17. Potassium
  18. Sodium
  19. Complete Blood Count (CBC)
  20. Total Cholesterol
  21. LDL Cholesterol
  22. HDL Cholesterol
  23. VLDL
  24. Triglycerides
  25. HBA1C
  26. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP)
  27. CK-MB
  28. C-Reactive Protein, HS
  29. D-Dimer
  30. Myoglobin
  31. Troponin
  32. Ferritin
  33. Folic Acid
  34. Total Iron Binding Capacity
  35. Transferrin
  36. % Transferrin Saturation
  37. Vitamin B12
  38. Vitamin D
  39. Magnesium
  40. Uric Acid
  41. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
  42. Free T3
  43. Free T4
  44. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA)
  45. % Free PSA
  46. Estradiol
  47. Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FH)
  48. Luteinizing hormone (LH)
  49. Progesterone
  50. Testosterone 
  51. Urinalysis
Anemia

Anemia is a medical condition characterized by a decrease in the number of red blood cells or a decrease in the amount of hemoglobin, an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen in the blood. This can lead to a reduction in the amount of oxygen delivered to the body’s tissues, resulting in symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and pale skin. Anemia can be caused by a variety of factors, including blood loss, poor nutrition, chronic diseases, and inherited conditions. The specific type of anemia is usually determined through a combination of medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests, including a Complete Blood Count (CBC) and iron studies. Treatment for anemia depends on the underlying cause and may include dietary changes, supplements, and medications.

Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) is a blood test that measures a variety of substances in the blood, including electrolytes, glucose, proteins, and liver and kidney function tests. The CMP is commonly used to evaluate overall health and to screen for a variety of medical conditions, such as diabetes, liver disease, and kidney disease.

The CMP typically includes the following tests:

  1. Albumin
  2. Albumin/Globulin Ratio (calc)
  3. Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)
  4. ALT (Alanine Aminotransferase)
  5. AST (Aspartate Aminotransferase)
  6. Bilirubin Total
  7. Bilirubin Direct
  8. Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)
  9. Calcium
  10. Carbon Dioxide
  11. Chloride
  12. Creatinine
  13. EGFR (calc)
  14. Iron
  15. Glucose
  16. Protein, Total
  17. Potassium
  18. Sodium

The results of a CMP can help healthcare providers diagnose and monitor a variety of medical conditions, such as diabetes, liver disease, and kidney disease. Abnormal levels in any of the CMP tests may indicate an underlying medical condition, and additional tests or evaluation may be needed to determine the cause and appropriate treatment.

It’s important to discuss the results of a CMP with a healthcare provider, who can provide the necessary context and recommend appropriate follow-up if needed.

Complete Blood Count (CBC)

A complete blood count (CBC) is a blood test that measures the different cells in the blood, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The CBC provides important information about a person’s overall health and can help diagnose a variety of medical conditions, including anemia, infections, and blood disorders.

The following components of the blood are measured during a CBC:

  1. Red blood cells (RBCs) – measure the number and size of red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the body’s tissues.
  2. Hemoglobin – measures the amount of oxygen-carrying protein in the blood.
  3. Hematocrit – measures the proportion of red blood cells to the total volume of blood.
  4. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) – measures the average size of red blood cells.
  5. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) – measures the average amount of hemoglobin in red blood cells.
  6. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) – measures the average concentration of hemoglobin in red blood cells.
  7. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width (RDW) is a blood test that measures the variation in size and shape of red blood cells.
  8. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width-Standard Deviation (RDW-SD) is a blood test that measures the variation in size and shape of red blood cells, with a focus on the degree of variation in width.
  9. Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) is a blood test that measures the average size of platelets in the blood.
  10. Platelets – measure the number of small cells that help blood to clot.
  11. White blood cells (WBCs) – measure the number of different types of white blood cells, which play a role in fighting infections.
  12. Lymphocytes % is a blood test that measures the percentage of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  13. Monocytes % is a blood test that measures the percentage of monocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  14. Neutrophils % is a blood test that measures the percentage of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  15. Eosinophils % is a blood test that measures the percentage of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood. Eosinophils play a key role in the immune system’s response to parasitic infections and allergic reactions.
  16. Basophils % is a blood test that measures the percentage of basophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood. Basophils play a role in the immune system’s response to allergies and parasitic infections.
  17. Lymphocytes # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  18. Monocytes # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of monocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  19. Neutrophils # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  20. Eosinophils # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  21. Basophils # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of basophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of a CBC and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. The normal range for the results of a CBC may vary depending on the laboratory that performs the test. It is important to keep in mind that the results of a CBC can be influenced by factors such as age, gender, and overall health.

Cholesterol Test or Lipid Panel

The lipid panel, also known as a cholesterol test or lipid profile, is a blood test that measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood. These include:

  1. Total cholesterol: This is the overall amount of cholesterol in the blood.
  2. LDL cholesterol: This is the “bad” cholesterol that contributes to the build-up of plaque in the arteries, increasing the risk of heart disease.
  3. HDL cholesterol: This is the “good” cholesterol that helps remove plaque from the arteries and reduce the risk of heart disease.
  4. Triglycerides: These are a type of fat in the blood that can increase the risk of heart disease if levels are high.

The lipid panel is usually performed as part of a routine health screening, or to monitor people who are at risk of developing heart disease. The results of the lipid panel, along with other factors such as age, family history, and lifestyle, can help healthcare providers determine a person’s risk of developing heart disease and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes.

Normal cholesterol levels vary, but total cholesterol levels should be less than 200 mg/dL, LDL cholesterol levels should be less than 130 mg/dL, HDL cholesterol levels should be 40 mg/dL or higher, and triglyceride levels should be less than 150 mg/dL.

HbA1C Blood Test

HbA1c (Glycated hemoglobin) is a blood test that measures the average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. The test provides a more long-term view of a person’s blood sugar control than a simple blood glucose test, which only measures the blood sugar level at a single point in time.

HbA1c is formed when glucose in the blood binds to hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. The higher a person’s blood sugar level over time, the more glucose is bound to hemoglobin, and the higher the HbA1c level will be.

A HbA1c test is used to monitor diabetes control and to diagnose diabetes. The test is typically done two to four times a year for people with diabetes. Normal HbA1c levels for people without diabetes are typically below 5.7%, while levels for people with diabetes are typically higher, between 7% and 8%. A healthcare provider can use the results of a HbA1c test to adjust treatment and make recommendations for lifestyle changes as needed.

Heart Health

Heart health refers to the overall well-being and proper functioning of the heart. The heart is a vital organ that pumps blood throughout the body, providing oxygen and nutrients to the cells and organs.

Maintaining good heart health is essential for overall health and wellness. Some steps that can help support heart health include:

  • Eating a healthy diet that is low in saturated and trans fats, and high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Engaging in regular physical activity
  • Not smoking and avoiding exposure to secondhand smoke
  • Limiting alcohol consumption
  • Managing stress and getting enough sleep
  • Controlling high blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes

If you have a family history of heart disease, are at risk for heart disease due to other health conditions, or have symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or a rapid or irregular heartbeat, it is important to speak with a healthcare professional. Early detection and treatment of heart disease can help prevent or slow progression and minimize the risk of serious complications, such as heart attack and stroke.

Hormone Blood Test

A hormone blood test is a laboratory test that measures the levels of specific hormones in the blood. Hormones are chemical messengers produced by various glands and tissues in the body, which regulate a wide range of physiological processes, such as growth and development, metabolism, and reproductive function. Hormone blood tests may be used to diagnose and monitor a variety of medical conditions related to hormonal imbalances, such as thyroid disorders, diabetes, and reproductive disorders. The type of hormone blood test ordered will depend on the specific hormone being tested and the medical condition being evaluated. It’s important to talk to a healthcare provider about any concerns related to hormone levels and whether a hormone blood test is necessary or appropriate.

Magnesium

A magnesium blood test is a medical test that measures the level of magnesium in the blood. Magnesium is an important electrolyte that plays a role in many biological processes, including muscle and nerve function, heart rhythm, and bone health. The test is typically ordered by a healthcare provider when there is a suspicion of a magnesium deficiency or excess, or when monitoring the progress of a patient with a known magnesium-related condition.

The test involves taking a blood sample, usually from a vein in the arm, which is then sent to a laboratory for analysis. The results of the test are reported as a concentration of magnesium in the blood, typically measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L).

Normal magnesium levels in the blood are typically between 1.7 to 2.2 mg/dL (0.7 to 0.9 mmol/L). Low levels of magnesium in the blood, also known as hypomagnesemia, can be caused by a variety of factors including malnutrition, alcoholism, kidney disease, and medications such as diuretics. High levels of magnesium in the blood, also known as hypermagnesemia, are rare but can be caused by kidney disease, excessive use of magnesium-containing medications or supplements, or certain genetic disorders.

It is important to interpret the results of a magnesium blood test in the context of a patient’s overall health and medical history, and in consultation with a healthcare provider.

Thyroid Health

Maintaining good thyroid health is important for overall health and well-being. Here are some tips to support thyroid health:

  1. Eat a healthy, balanced diet: A diet rich in nutrients, including iodine and selenium, can support thyroid function. Good sources of iodine include seaweed, fish, and dairy products, while selenium-rich foods include Brazil nuts, fish, and meat.

  2. Exercise regularly: Regular physical activity can help support overall health, including thyroid function.

  3. Get enough rest: Adequate sleep and rest are important for overall health, and can help support healthy thyroid function.

  4. Manage stress: Chronic stress can affect thyroid function, so finding ways to manage stress, such as through relaxation techniques or exercise, can be beneficial.

  5. Avoid smoking and excessive alcohol consumption: Both smoking and excessive alcohol consumption can have negative effects on thyroid health.

  6. Monitor your thyroid function: If you have risk factors for thyroid problems, such as a family history or certain medical conditions, talk to your healthcare provider about monitoring your thyroid function with blood tests.

It’s important to note that thyroid health is complex and influenced by many factors, so it’s important to work with a healthcare provider to develop a personalized plan for maintaining good thyroid health.

Uric Acid

Uric acid is a waste product that is produced by the body during the breakdown of purines, which are natural substances found in many foods and in the body’s cells. Most uric acid is filtered out of the blood by the kidneys and eliminated from the body in urine. However, if the body produces too much uric acid or the kidneys are unable to eliminate it properly, the level of uric acid in the blood can become too high, leading to a condition called hyperuricemia.

Hyperuricemia can cause urate crystals to form in joints, leading to a painful condition called gout. In addition, high levels of uric acid in the blood can increase the risk of developing kidney stones and may also be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

A blood test can measure the level of uric acid in the blood. The normal range for uric acid levels in the blood can vary depending on the laboratory, but typically falls between 3.4 and 7.2 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) for men, and between 2.4 and 6.0 mg/dL for women. High levels of uric acid in the blood are typically above 7.2 mg/dL for men and above 6.0 mg/dL for women.

Treatment for high uric acid levels may include lifestyle changes such as reducing purine-rich foods and increasing fluid intake, as well as medications such as allopurinol, which can help lower uric acid levels. It is important to work with a healthcare provider to determine the best course of treatment based on individual medical history and circumstances.

Vitamin Deficiency

Vitamin deficiencies occur when a person doesn’t consume enough of a particular vitamin or the body doesn’t properly absorb or utilize the vitamin. Some common vitamin deficiencies include:

  1. Vitamin D deficiency: can lead to weakened bones, increased risk of fractures, and other health problems.

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency: can cause anemia, nerve damage, and other health problems.

  3. Vitamin C deficiency: can lead to scurvy, a condition characterized by fatigue, weakness, and other symptoms.

  4. Vitamin A deficiency: can cause vision problems, weakened immunity, and other health issues.

  5. Folate (vitamin B9) deficiency: can lead to anemia, birth defects, and other health problems.

  6. Vitamin E deficiency: can cause nerve damage, muscle weakness, and other health issues.

Vitamin deficiencies can be diagnosed through blood tests and may be treated with vitamin supplements or changes to the diet. It’s important to talk to a healthcare provider if you suspect a vitamin deficiency, as untreated deficiencies can have serious health consequences.

Urinalysis

Urinalysis is a diagnostic test that examines a person’s urine to evaluate their overall health and to detect certain medical conditions. A healthcare provider may order a urinalysis as part of a routine physical exam or to investigate specific symptoms or conditions, such as urinary tract infections, kidney disease, or diabetes.

During a urinalysis, a small sample of urine is collected and examined in a laboratory. The urine sample is typically analyzed for the presence of various substances, such as glucose, protein, and blood, as well as bacteria and other microorganisms.

Urinalysis can provide important information about a person’s health, such as their kidney function, urinary tract health, and blood sugar levels. The results of a urinalysis can help healthcare providers diagnose and monitor a variety of medical conditions.

It’s important to discuss the results of a urinalysis with a healthcare provider, who can provide the necessary context and recommend appropriate follow-up if needed.

Specimen Requirements
  • SST tube of blood, serum
  • Lavender top, plasma
  • Urine
Turn Around Time

5 to 24 hours

Price For Test

$499