Heart Health Blood Test

$149.00

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About the Test

Heart health refers to the overall well-being and proper functioning of the heart. The heart is a vital organ that pumps blood throughout the body, providing oxygen and nutrients to the cells and organs.

If you have a family history of heart disease, are at risk for heart disease due to other health conditions, or have symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or a rapid or irregular heartbeat, it is important to speak with a healthcare professional. Early detection and treatment of heart disease can help prevent or slow progression and minimize the risk of serious complications, such as heart attack and stroke.

FAQs

Specimen Requirements :

SST tube of blood, serum

Turn Around Time :

    5 to 24 hours

Price For Test :

    Price: $149

Overview of Heart Health

Heart health refers to the overall well-being and proper functioning of the heart. The heart is a vital organ that pumps blood throughout the body, providing oxygen and nutrients to the cells and organs.

Maintaining good heart health is essential for overall health and wellness. Some steps that can help support heart health include:

  • Eating a healthy diet that is low in saturated and trans fats, and high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Engaging in regular physical activity
  • Not smoking and avoiding exposure to secondhand smoke
  • Limiting alcohol consumption
  • Managing stress and getting enough sleep
  • Controlling high blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes

If you have a family history of heart disease, are at risk for heart disease due to other health conditions, or have symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or a rapid or irregular heartbeat, it is important to speak with a healthcare professional. Early detection and treatment of heart disease can help prevent or slow progression and minimize the risk of serious complications, such as heart attack and stroke.

Analytes Tested In The Heart Health Blood Test Panel

9 Analytes

  1. Total Cholesterol
  2. LDL Cholesterol
  3. HDL Cholesterol
  4. VLDL
  5. Triglycerides
  6. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP)
  7. C-Reactive Protein, HS
  8. D-Dimer
  9. Troponin
Total Cholesterol

Total cholesterol is a measure of the overall amount of cholesterol in the blood. Cholesterol is a type of fat that is produced by the liver and also obtained from food.

High levels of total cholesterol can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke by contributing to the buildup of plaque in the arteries. The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening.

A total cholesterol test is typically performed as part of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides.

Normal total cholesterol levels are considered to be less than 200 mg/dL. However, the target level of total cholesterol depends on a person’s individual risk factors, such as age, family history, and lifestyle. A healthcare provider can interpret the results of a total cholesterol test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed.

LDL Cholesterol

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is sometimes referred to as the “bad” cholesterol because high levels can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. LDL cholesterol contributes to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, which can narrow or block blood flow.

The LDL cholesterol test measures the amount of LDL cholesterol in the blood. It is typically performed as part of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides.

The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening. Normal LDL cholesterol levels are considered to be less than 130 mg/dL. However, the target level of LDL cholesterol depends on a person’s individual risk factors, such as age, family history, and lifestyle.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of an LDL cholesterol test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. This may include changes to diet and exercise, as well as medication to lower cholesterol levels.

HDL Cholesterol

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is sometimes referred to as the “good” cholesterol because high levels are associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke. HDL cholesterol helps remove plaque from the arteries and reduce the risk of heart disease.

The HDL cholesterol test measures the amount of HDL cholesterol in the blood. It is typically performed as part of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.

The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening. Normal HDL cholesterol levels are considered to be 40 mg/dL or higher. Higher levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with a lower risk of heart disease, while lower levels are associated with an increased risk.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of an HDL cholesterol test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. This may include changes to diet and exercise, as well as medication to raise HDL cholesterol levels.

VLDL

Very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) is a type of lipid, or fat, found in the blood. VLDL is produced by the liver and is a source of triglycerides, which are a form of fat that is stored in the body’s fat cells.

VLDL is one of the components of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides. The VLDL test measures the amount of VLDL in the blood.

High levels of VLDL in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. VLDL contributes to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, which can narrow or block blood flow.

The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening. Normal VLDL levels vary, but are typically considered to be less than 30 mg/dL. However, the target level of VLDL depends on a person’s individual risk factors, such as age, family history, and lifestyle.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of a VLDL test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. This may include changes to diet, exercise, and medication to lower VLDL levels.

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a type of fat that is found in the blood and stored in the body’s fat cells. Triglycerides are the main form of fat in the diet and are also produced by the liver.

The triglycerides blood test measures the amount of triglycerides in the blood. It is typically performed as part of a lipid panel, which measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides.

High levels of triglycerides in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Triglycerides contribute to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, which can narrow or block blood flow.

The American Heart Association recommends that people have their cholesterol levels checked regularly, as part of a routine health screening. Normal triglyceride levels are considered to be less than 150 mg/dL. However, the target level of triglycerides depends on a person’s individual risk factors, such as age, family history, and lifestyle.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of a triglycerides test and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. This may include changes to diet, exercise, and medication to lower triglyceride levels.

B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP)

BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) is a hormone produced by the heart. It is released in response to increased pressure in the heart, such as that seen in conditions such as heart failure. BNP levels are measured in a blood test to help diagnose and monitor heart failure and other cardiac conditions.

In general, elevated levels of BNP suggest that the heart is not functioning normally and may be struggling to pump blood effectively, as seen in heart failure. However, other conditions such as chronic lung disease, kidney disease, and certain medications can also increase BNP levels. A healthcare professional will interpret the results in the context of a person’s overall health and medical history. The normal range for BNP may vary depending on the laboratory, but generally falls between 0-100 pg/mL.

C-Reactive Protein, HS

C-Reactive Protein (CRP), high sensitivity (hs-CRP) is a protein produced by the liver in response to inflammation in the body. It is measured in a blood test to evaluate a person’s level of inflammation. The high sensitivity test (hs-CRP) is a more sensitive version of the CRP test and can detect low levels of inflammation.

Elevated levels of CRP, especially hs-CRP, are associated with an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, and other chronic conditions. The normal range for hs-CRP may vary depending on the laboratory, but generally falls between 0-3 mg/L. A healthcare professional will interpret the results in the context of a person’s overall health and medical history. In general, the lower the hs-CRP level, the lower the level of inflammation and the lower the risk of heart disease and other chronic conditions.

D-Dimer

D-dimer is a substance that is produced when blood clots are broken down. It is measured in a blood test to evaluate the likelihood of a blood clot (thrombosis) in the body. Elevated levels of D-dimer can indicate the presence of a blood clot in the veins, such as a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or a pulmonary embolism (PE), or other conditions such as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

The normal range for D-dimer may vary depending on the laboratory, but generally falls below a certain threshold, typically 500 ng/mL. However, it’s important to note that even if the D-dimer level is elevated, it does not definitively confirm the presence of a blood clot. A healthcare professional will interpret the results in the context of a person’s overall health, medical history, and other clinical findings. In some cases, additional tests such as imaging studies may be necessary to confirm a diagnosis.

Troponin

Troponin is a protein that is found in heart muscle cells and is released into the bloodstream when the heart is damaged. It is measured in a blood test to diagnose and monitor heart damage, especially in cases of suspected heart attack (acute myocardial infarction).

Elevated levels of troponin in the blood indicate that the heart has been damaged and can help diagnose a heart attack. The normal range for troponin may vary depending on the laboratory, but is typically less than 0.03 ng/mL. A healthcare professional will interpret the results in the context of a person’s overall health, medical history, and other clinical findings. Repeat testing over a period of several hours can help to confirm the diagnosis of a heart attack and monitor the extent of heart muscle damage.

Specimen Requirements

SST tube of blood, serum

Turn Around Time

5 to 24 hours

Price For Test

Price: $149