Female Basic Wellness Blood Panel

$169.00

Category:

About the Test

The Female Basic Wellness Blood Panel is a set of blood tests that are designed to assess a woman’s overall health and wellbeing. These tests typically include a variety of tests that evaluate various aspects of a woman’s health, including blood sugar, cholesterol, liver and kidney function, hormonal levels, and more.

The Female Basic Wellness Blood Panel can be helpful for detecting and managing a variety of medical conditions, such as thyroid disorders, diabetes, and hormonal imbalances. The results of the blood test can help healthcare providers make a diagnosis and develop a treatment plan if necessary.

FAQs

Specimen Requirements :

SST tube of blood, serum

Turn Around Time :

    5 to 24 hours

Price For Test :

    Price: $169

Price For Test

Price: $149

Overview Of The Women’s General Wellness Blood Test Panel

A comprehensive women’s wellness blood test is a set of blood tests that are designed to assess a woman’s overall health and wellbeing. These tests typically include a variety of tests that evaluate various aspects of a woman’s health, including blood sugar, cholesterol, liver and kidney function, hormonal levels, and more.

Specific tests included in a comprehensive women’s wellness blood test can vary depending on the healthcare provider or lab that administers the test, but some common tests that may be included are:

  • Complete blood count (CBC)
  • Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP)
  • Lipid panel
  • Diabetes panel
  • Thyroid function tests (TSH, free T4)
  • Vitamin D level
  • Iron panel
  • Sex hormone levels (estradiol, progesterone, testosterone)

A comprehensive women’s wellness blood test can be helpful for detecting and managing a variety of medical conditions, such as thyroid disorders, diabetes, and hormonal imbalances. The results of the blood test can help healthcare providers make a diagnosis and develop a treatment plan if necessary.

Analytes Tested

27 Analytes

  1. Albumin
  2. Albumin/Globulin Ratio (calc)
  3. Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)
  4. ALT (Alanine Aminotransferase)
  5. AST (Aspartate Aminotransferase)
  6. Bilirubin Total
  7. Bilirubin Direct
  8. Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)
  9. Calcium
  10. Carbon Dioxide
  11. Chloride
  12. Creatinine
  13. EGFR (calc)
  14. Iron
  15. Glucose
  16. Protein, Total
  17. Potassium
  18. Sodium
  19. Complete Blood Count (CBC)
  20. Total Cholesterol
  21. LDL Cholesterol
  22. HDL Cholesterol
  23. VLDL
  24. Triglycerides
  25. HBA1C
  26. TSH
  27. Urinalyses
Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) is a blood test that measures a variety of substances in the blood, including electrolytes, glucose, proteins, and liver and kidney function tests. The CMP is commonly used to evaluate overall health and to screen for a variety of medical conditions, such as diabetes, liver disease, and kidney disease.

The CMP typically includes the following tests:

  1. Albumin
  2. Albumin/Globulin Ratio (calc)
  3. Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)
  4. ALT (Alanine Aminotransferase)
  5. AST (Aspartate Aminotransferase)
  6. Bilirubin Total
  7. Bilirubin Direct
  8. Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)
  9. Calcium
  10. Carbon Dioxide
  11. Chloride
  12. Creatinine
  13. EGFR (calc)
  14. Iron
  15. Glucose
  16. Protein, Total
  17. Potassium
  18. Sodium

The results of a CMP can help healthcare providers diagnose and monitor a variety of medical conditions, such as diabetes, liver disease, and kidney disease. Abnormal levels in any of the CMP tests may indicate an underlying medical condition, and additional tests or evaluation may be needed to determine the cause and appropriate treatment.

It’s important to discuss the results of a CMP with a healthcare provider, who can provide the necessary context and recommend appropriate follow-up if needed.

Complete Blood Count (CBC)

A complete blood count (CBC) is a blood test that measures the different cells in the blood, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The CBC provides important information about a person’s overall health and can help diagnose a variety of medical conditions, including anemia, infections, and blood disorders.

The following components of the blood are measured during a CBC:

  1. Red blood cells (RBCs) – measure the number and size of red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the body’s tissues.
  2. Hemoglobin – measures the amount of oxygen-carrying protein in the blood.
  3. Hematocrit – measures the proportion of red blood cells to the total volume of blood.
  4. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) – measures the average size of red blood cells.
  5. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) – measures the average amount of hemoglobin in red blood cells.
  6. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) – measures the average concentration of hemoglobin in red blood cells.
  7. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width (RDW) is a blood test that measures the variation in size and shape of red blood cells.
  8. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width-Standard Deviation (RDW-SD) is a blood test that measures the variation in size and shape of red blood cells, with a focus on the degree of variation in width.
  9. Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) is a blood test that measures the average size of platelets in the blood.
  10. Platelets – measure the number of small cells that help blood to clot.
  11. White blood cells (WBCs) – measure the number of different types of white blood cells, which play a role in fighting infections.
  12. Lymphocytes % is a blood test that measures the percentage of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  13. Monocytes % is a blood test that measures the percentage of monocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  14. Neutrophils % is a blood test that measures the percentage of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  15. Eosinophils % is a blood test that measures the percentage of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood. Eosinophils play a key role in the immune system’s response to parasitic infections and allergic reactions.
  16. Basophils % is a blood test that measures the percentage of basophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood. Basophils play a role in the immune system’s response to allergies and parasitic infections.
  17. Lymphocytes # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  18. Monocytes # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of monocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  19. Neutrophils # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  20. Eosinophils # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.
  21. Basophils # is a blood test that measures the absolute number of basophils, a type of white blood cell, in the blood.

A healthcare provider can interpret the results of a CBC and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes as needed. The normal range for the results of a CBC may vary depending on the laboratory that performs the test. It is important to keep in mind that the results of a CBC can be influenced by factors such as age, gender, and overall health.

Cholesterol Test or Lipid Panel

The lipid panel, also known as a cholesterol test or lipid profile, is a blood test that measures the levels of different types of fats (lipids) in the blood. These include:

  1. Total cholesterol: This is the overall amount of cholesterol in the blood.
  2. LDL cholesterol: This is the “bad” cholesterol that contributes to the build-up of plaque in the arteries, increasing the risk of heart disease.
  3. HDL cholesterol: This is the “good” cholesterol that helps remove plaque from the arteries and reduce the risk of heart disease.
  4. Triglycerides: These are a type of fat in the blood that can increase the risk of heart disease if levels are high.

The lipid panel is usually performed as part of a routine health screening, or to monitor people who are at risk of developing heart disease. The results of the lipid panel, along with other factors such as age, family history, and lifestyle, can help healthcare providers determine a person’s risk of developing heart disease and make recommendations for treatment or lifestyle changes.

Normal cholesterol levels vary, but total cholesterol levels should be less than 200 mg/dL, LDL cholesterol levels should be less than 130 mg/dL, HDL cholesterol levels should be 40 mg/dL or higher, and triglyceride levels should be less than 150 mg/dL.

HbA1C Blood Test

HbA1c (Glycated hemoglobin) is a blood test that measures the average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. The test provides a more long-term view of a person’s blood sugar control than a simple blood glucose test, which only measures the blood sugar level at a single point in time.

HbA1c is formed when glucose in the blood binds to hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. The higher a person’s blood sugar level over time, the more glucose is bound to hemoglobin, and the higher the HbA1c level will be.

A HbA1c test is used to monitor diabetes control and to diagnose diabetes. The test is typically done two to four times a year for people with diabetes. Normal HbA1c levels for people without diabetes are typically below 5.7%, while levels for people with diabetes are typically higher, between 7% and 8%. A healthcare provider can use the results of a HbA1c test to adjust treatment and make recommendations for lifestyle changes as needed.

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

TSH stands for thyroid-stimulating hormone, which is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland in the brain. TSH stimulates the thyroid gland, which is located in the neck, to produce thyroid hormones that help regulate metabolism and other bodily functions. A TSH blood test measures the level of TSH in the blood and is often used to diagnose and monitor thyroid problems, such as an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) or an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism). High levels of TSH usually indicate an underactive thyroid, while low levels of TSH usually indicate an overactive thyroid. However, interpreting TSH test results can be complex, and healthcare providers may use additional tests and clinical evaluation to make a diagnosis and determine appropriate treatment.

Urinalysis

Urinalysis is a diagnostic test that examines a person’s urine to evaluate their overall health and to detect certain medical conditions. A healthcare provider may order a urinalysis as part of a routine physical exam or to investigate specific symptoms or conditions, such as urinary tract infections, kidney disease, or diabetes.

During a urinalysis, a small sample of urine is collected and examined in a laboratory. The urine sample is typically analyzed for the presence of various substances, such as glucose, protein, and blood, as well as bacteria and other microorganisms.

Urinalysis can provide important information about a person’s health, such as their kidney function, urinary tract health, and blood sugar levels. The results of a urinalysis can help healthcare providers diagnose and monitor a variety of medical conditions.

It’s important to discuss the results of a urinalysis with a healthcare provider, who can provide the necessary context and recommend appropriate follow-up if needed.

Specimen Requirements

SST tube of blood, serum

Turn Around Time

5 to 24 hours

Price For Test

Price: $169